Design and Science

Can design advance science, and can science advance design?
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Design and Science
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Director, MIT Media Lab

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George Murray: While I read this piece, my attention kept flitting back to a memory from my training at a small subsidiary of Chung Eun Kim's Taekwondo Academy. One of the high-ranking students taught me the fir...
Can design be considered as an unconventional action oriented scientific attitude?
JoseAntonio Vanderhorst-Silverio: This is a space about what google resulted from my action oriented scientific attitude search. All 7 hits that I can see are mine. That emerged from applications based on my interpretation of the S...
non-elephant animals?
Jo Bailey: A potentially stupid question, but this has been bugging me and I can’t quite get my head around it. When I first read the sentence about non-elephant animals, it somehow transliterated in my mind ...
New
Wille-Meike Brand: new
Discussion on May 23, 2016
joanna boehnert: Design theory needs to distinguish between life-sustaining and life-destroying entanglements. The natural and the artificial are distinct from one another as one is the context of the other. This c...
Discussion on Apr 15, 2016
Raman Agrawalla: Antidisciplinary seems to be more profound than other concepts, including 'transdidciplinary'; i feel. Dr. Raman Agrawalla
Discussion on Mar 22, 2016
Alex Cheek: Joi, do you have a way of describing what it would mean to advance design? Not being a scientist, science seems to have a telos of expansion of knowledge towards the elusive theory of everything. D...
Discussion on Mar 20, 2016
Adam Fulford: "As participant designers, we focus on changing ourselves and the way we do things in order to change the world." I've found that Kanji characters, as used in Japan, are helpful for organising thou...
Discussion on Mar 16, 2016
Franz Bruckhoff: The concept of antidisciplinary space is fascinating. It allows us to think the unthinkable and achieve the impossible. I often think of it as the process of "collecting and connecting the dots", w...
Discussion on Mar 14, 2016
Paul T. Kidd: This is similar to how I perceived the way disciplinary knowledge is organised with vast open and unexplored prairies lying between the disciplinary settlements. Back in the mid 80s I wanted to pur...
Discussion on Mar 11, 2016
Beth Anderson: I am delighted to find this journal, and in particular, this article! We have been creating 3D animations to illuminate the complexities of biological systems for the better part of two decades, bu...
Discussion on Mar 11, 2016
EVAN FREEDMAN: What a beautiful way to attract creative, progressive thinkers. I really wish I could use a word other than creative here (I thought about iconoclastic but that seemed to confrontational). That sai...
Discussion on Mar 11, 2016
Bill Welense:
Discussion on Mar 11, 2016
Bill Welense: Antidisciplinary is a word that my mind has been searching for for quite some time. It's like that moment when something is on the tip fo your toungue, your mind knows the answer, but can't think o...
Discussion on Mar 11, 2016
Gabriel Figueiredo: Have you seen Flaviano Celaschi's diagram? It's (literally) design-centric, but it has a different take on the deal between "Design vs Science" and "Design as a Suitcase Word" you talk about. You c...
Discussion on Mar 10, 2016
Richard Dwinell: Hey didn't Gandhi say that "Be the change you wish to see in the world." I hope that I didn't miss all the important forms and functions of this article (the possibility is high) but when re-readin...
Joichi Ito: I've been thinking a lot about Gandhi and hadn't through to tie him into this article. I've been thinking about him more in the context of disobedience - a key force of change. I googled around and...
Discussion on Mar 10, 2016
john hessler: This is a great idea...truly a need for this kind of journal. In my own work on the history of computing science and design are never far apart. http://blogs.loc.gov/maps/2016/03/computing-space-vi...
Discussion on Mar 01, 2016
Nikos Houssos:
Discussion on Feb 29, 2016
Mike Stringer: I think this is a key point! Designing complex adaptive systems will likely involve designing rules or algorithms for participants rather than directly designing outcomes. While still in their infa...
Discussion on Feb 25, 2016
Boris Anthony: I find this development fascinating as my own research over the last 5 years has indicated that what we call design is in the midst of another evolution. In the last ~200 years, it has gone from cr...
Discussion on Feb 24, 2016
Timothy Scholl: Oxman's cycle is an interesting starting point, being a 2D representation. I feel like you touch on the limitations of thinking about Design and Science in this way, and wonder about the connection...
Discussion on Feb 11, 2016
Raymond Pirouz: It's a great idea and one that can succeed so long as 'prestige' is associated with the journal, no matter how experimental. No academic I know will admit this but they are 'consumers' of knowledge...
Peter Hourdequin: I am an academic of sorts: a language teacher in a university setting. I do research that is mostly focused on understanding and improving practice. This once would have meant a focus on either tea...
Discussion on Feb 09, 2016
Stewart Brand: A format design comment: Gray type on a white background is a pain to read. Legibility counts.
Eric Maize: +1, especially gray type in a super light-weight font...
Discussion on Feb 09, 2016
Stewart Brand: "Design Science” was an obsession of Buckminster Fuller’. He sometimes called it “Comprehensive Anticipatory Design Science.” A primer of his views is here: https://bfi.org/design-science/primer
Andrew Menzer: I think the science and design meet where engineering and economics combine. Industry has always been the most efficient means of diffusing advanced technologies across a specific population, espec...
Discussion on Jan 24, 2016
Danny Hillis: Survived or thrived?
Joichi Ito: Made suggested edit.
Discussion on Jan 24, 2016
Danny Hillis: This is what I have been calling The Entanglement, that is, the entaglement of nature and technology so that the distintion becomes increasingly meaningless.
Stewart Brand: Agreed. I ended my WHOLE EARTH DISCIPLINE book with the line: “What we call natural and what we call human are inseparable. We live one life.”
Discussion on Jan 24, 2016
Danny Hillis: Represent or present?
Joichi Ito: Fixed this.
Discussion on Jan 24, 2016
Danny Hillis: In fact, Cycbernetis became a discipline. It produced some good aswers to broad questions, but then it became about those answers, rather than about the orginal questions.
Discussion on Jan 24, 2016
Danny Hillis: is or was?
Joichi Ito: Made suggested edit.
Adam Fulford: Hi Danny -- in which sentence?
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Discussion on Jan 20, 2016
Michael Dila: Your intent to create a platform for antidisciplinary thinking and exploration is exciting: particularly in its suggestion of problems that sit in the places "between"; obscured by or invisible to ...
Discussion on Jan 18, 2016
Dan Lockton: Do you think much of the strength of this antidisciplinarity comes from this complex mosaic? i.e. the variety of being able to deal with the world in different ways, and the recognition that these ...
Joichi Ito: That's an interesting and good point. I think we still need the disciplines and their rigor. I think language defines and helps us think, but it also limits us. I think that being able to move betw...
Dan Lockton: Thanks Joi. Yes, definitely AND. I think even having an organisation like the Media Lab that explicitly recognises the value of depth and breadth, and has an explicit aim of enabling "going meta", ...
Discussion on Jan 18, 2016
Tim Brown: The growth of AI and data networks might liberate designers and scientists to be more ‘anti-disciplinary’ because the machines can take care of the many forms of expertise we need to tackle problem...
Joichi Ito: I think the role of AI in research is very interesting. Hiroaki Kitano and others are trying to design AI systems to manage and possibly even come up with questions for research. English language p...
Discussion on Jan 18, 2016
Tim Brown: I like the idea of the anti-disciplinary journal and I wonder in what forms this might come to life? A journal of beginnings perhaps, not just endings, where expert crowd funding is used to encoura...
Discussion on Jan 18, 2016
Tim Brown: I suppose this is obvious, but experimentation (in the methodological sense) is shared by both design and science as a principle tool for discovery. Is this true for engineering and art?
Discussion on Jan 18, 2016
Tim Brown: I don’t pretend to understand all of your references to cybernetic systems but agree with the premise about complex adaptive systems and the changing role of the designer from planner to participan...
Jeff Sussna: Ranulph Glanville probably did the best job of connecting cybernetics and design. Shortly before his death in 2014 he gave a wonderful talk called "How Design and Cybernetics Reflect Each Other" ht...
Discussion on Jan 12, 2016
Paola Antonelli: Regarding design, its role in devising adaptive systems, and efficiency: This becomes really huge, but for some--myself included--an effort towards formal elegance is necessary for a planning exerc...
Michael Dila: I am not sure precisely what you mean by formal elegance. It sounds like an epistemological aesthetic for maths or something. In any case, it seems like you are trying to make an important distinct...
Francesco Bertelli: Best comment.
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