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Evgeni Sergeev 3/3/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
Selection made on Version 3
Simulated biological processes do not understand the system in the same sense that a human designer does.
Yet, luckily, the end result may be understood by a designer to a large extent (e.g. organs in a body). Maybe the best fusion will be achieved when we learn to contribute our designer’s understanding to an evolving system in real time. Rather than passively watching it.
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gabriel licina 4/10/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
You vastly overestimate our understanding of biological systems…
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Danny Hillis 7/26/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
The relation to parts to function is more complex in a biological systems than in an engineered systems, but I agree that they sometimes have have parts with understandable function, for example the heart pumping blood. These doesn’t happen always, but it happens enough to require an explanation. Why should evolution make parts with narrow functions, when it can also make integrated functions that emerge holistically, like the immune the system? I think the answer has something to do with what is easy to evolve. I think the same modularity that makes organs understandable also makes it easier for them to evolve under natural selection.