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Greg Borenstein 2/25/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
I might be wrong, but didn’t software inherit the word “user” from Christopher Alexander? He uses it extensively in all of his writings from very early, but most pointedly in The Oregon Experiment which is all about his massive years-long collaboration with the UoO community in designing their campus: https://books.google.com/books?id=u2NSI4vSu_IC&pg=PA58&dq=inauthor:“Christopher+Alexander”+“users”&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwii9emp5pPLAhUU1GMKHWJ2CEEQ6AEIHTAA#v=onepage&q=inauthor%3A"Christopher Alexander" “users”&f=false Alexander was (maybe with Jacobs) Modernism’s great dissident in architecture. And, maybe not conincidentally, has had his greatest influence through software – particularly in how Ward Cunningham, the creator of the wiki, and the community of the first wiki adopted his Pattern Language ideas for describing systems and (in the wiki itself) his community-centric idea for how to run systems.
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David Hecht 2/27/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
At the very least, Eliot Noyes and others at IBM were talking about users before Alexander (John Harwood covers this extensively in his book, “The Interface”), though he fits well into the historical arc around what Kevin is writing about.